Lavender Heat Bag

With Christmas getting closer, we have been working on some home made Christmas gifts. First up, we have been sewing some Lavender Heat Bags, filled with wheat and lavender. We have used offcuts of flannel fabric that we have left over from some pyjamas we made earlier this year. Flannel makes for an extra cosy heat bag. They are great in winter to warm the bed, and are also great gifts for anyone who suffers from muscular aches and pains. If you live in a cold climate, you can also make smaller versions to slip in coat pockets to warm your hands in winter.

We usually add a little ribbon tag to our heat bags for decoration (although they can be useful for picking up hot bags from the microwave). Ribbon is from Ribbons Galore.

One of our most popular tutorials is our winter warmers Lavender Wheat Bag. You can find our tutorial here
 if you would like to make your own.
As we looked over our archives, we realised we have made quite a number of heat bags over the past few years. You can find our Patchwork Heat Pack for necks here …
… and you can read about our Heat Packs made from quilting cottons here.
We buy our wheat from the pet food aisle of our supermarket. When we run out of wheat, we have also used uncooked rice and that works just as well.
Have you made a start on your home made gifts for Christmas?
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Comments

  1. Jenny says

    I’d love to know more about the wheat you use as the filler. I’m fairly certain our pet food aisle doesn’t carry a bag of wheat, can you tell me more about it and where else to look for it? I’ve tried using rice and don’t like it nearly as much as my brand name “Magic Bag” but I want to make some this year and want to find a good filler. Thanks so much, great post, gorgeous pictures!

  2. says

    I had a hard time finding whole wheat. I am wondering what else works really well.
    Can I just use the wheat grain at the bulk section in the store?

  3. says

    Do you have to treat the wheat at all? We are farmers, so I was wondering if I could just use the wheat that we have harvested. Look forward to hearing from you x

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